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Mathematics [clear filter]
Wednesday, October 16
 

8:20am

Detracking Policy in SFUSD: Our Ongoing Commitment to Equity
This session is a part of our special Wednesday focus on professional development in mathematics. It will take place at Hillcrest Elementary School in San Francisco.

SFUSD's vision for mathematics is that all students will make sense of rigorous mathematics in ways that are creative, interactive, and relevant in heterogeneous classrooms. Our equity strategies towards this goal include both the visionary work of teams of teachers engaging in lesson study, and also our work to end tracking in secondary mathematics. This morning's session will frame our work towards rigorous math in heterogeneous classrooms, describing the policy itself relative to research and data, as well as sharing current outcomes.

There will be opportunities for questions in a later session.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Lizzy Hull Barnes

Lizzy Hull Barnes

Math Supervisor, San Francisco Unified School District
Lizzy Hull Barnes has taught math to PreK–6th graders in schools around the Bay Area, and she has supported the learning of adults in Louisiana and fellow teachers and coaches in San Francisco. The Common Core has provided all of us a precious window to reframe the question "What... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 8:20am - 8:35am
Hillcrest Elementary School (SFUSD) 810 Silver Ave, San Francisco, CA 94134

10:15am

Lesson Study in Mathematics
This session is a part of our special Wednesday focus on professional development in mathematics. It will take place at Hillcrest Elementary School in San Francisco.

SFUSD has been making notable strides toward our vision that all students make sense of rigorous mathematics in ways that are creative, interactive, and relevant in heterogeneous classrooms. Through efforts to design and refine a problem-based curriculum, detrack high school math, and increase participation in advanced math courses, and through the development of math teacher leaders and math coaches in our schools, SFUSD has been a role model for other urban districts seeking to shift the practice of mathematics toward inquiry, critical thinking, and equitable outcomes. This impact has been accomplished in part through ongoing, responsive professional development efforts, including complex instruction, problem-solving cycles, and lesson study. A cohort of SFUSD schools has been committed to whole school lesson study within mathematics, focused on Teaching Through Problem Solving (TTP). These schools seek to ensure the participation of all educators in one or more rigorous lesson study cycles annually, toward the goal of accelerating math achievement for each and every student — so that students are confident, independent learners able to engage in high-level problem-solving and productive discussion, and able to use evidence and reason to construct viable arguments. Our cohort of schools believes that lesson study is a powerful lever for enhancing teachers' pedagogical content knowledge through the development of a research question, collaborative research and lesson planning, detailed observation, and the moderated debriefing of lessons. Using the Teaching Through Problem Solving protocol, Lauren Williams and the team will present a fifth-grade mathematics lesson with a class of Hillcrest Elementary students. Observers will have the opportunity to hear how the group developed their inquiry and resulting lesson, watch the lesson live with students, and participate in the debriefing. Expert commentary on the mathematics of the lesson will come from Dr. Harold Asturias. Final comments on the day will be from Annie Fetter.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Joseph Mannarino

Joseph Mannarino

5th Grade Teacher, John Muir Elementary School
Joseph is in his fourth year as a 5th-grade teacher at John Muir. He studied music and Spanish in college, working previously as a theater arts teacher and director for kids. He pursued his master's through the San Francisco Teacher Residency program. Joseph has attended the IMPULS... Read More →
avatar for Karen Cortez-Ramirez

Karen Cortez-Ramirez

3rd Grade Spanish Bilingual Teacher, San Francisco Unified School District
My name is Karen Cortez-Ramirez. I am originally from Los Angeles and have been a public school educator for 11 years. I believe all teachers should strive to be agents of change. I have been teaching at Hillcrest Elementary in San Francisco since 2011, have spent most of my years... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Williams

Lauren Williams

Classroom Teacher, 5th Grade Gen Ed, Hillcrest Elementary School
Lauren has been a teacher at Hillcrest since 2013 and a Lesson Study participant since 2015. She attended IMPULS in Japan during the summer of 2018 and has loved bringing her learning back to her classroom and school site.
avatar for Nora Houseman

Nora Houseman

Supervisor, Professional Learning & Leadership, San Francisco Unified School District
Nora Houseman grew up in Washington, DC, attending district public schools K–12 and leaving high school determined to further equity and justice in public schooling. Nora taught middle school for nine years in Oakland, San Lorenzo, and San Francisco, then served as the site principal... Read More →
avatar for Rashida Carter

Rashida Carter

Teacher, San Francisco Unified School District
I am a graduate of Syracuse University (BS)  and University of San Francisco (MAT). While at USF I was in the SFTR (San Francisco Teacher Residency) program and did my residency at John Muir Elementary School. I have taught at John Muir for the past 3 years and am currently a 5th... Read More →
avatar for Sara Liebert

Sara Liebert

Principal, John Muir Elementary School
Sara Liebert is the principal at John Muir Elementary School in San Francisco, CA, and she has held several roles: math instructional coach, math teacher for fourth- and fifth-grade students, and lead teacher for the district’s Lesson Study project.


Wednesday October 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am
Hillcrest Elementary School (SFUSD) 810 Silver Ave, San Francisco, CA 94134

1:15pm

Lesson Study Live: Tying it All Together - Lessons from a Knowledgeable Other
This session is a part of the Spotlight Wednesday at Hillcrest Elementary School in San Francisco and will be based on the live research lesson with Hillcrest students immediately prior to this session.

When I was a novice teacher, I observed research lessons with experienced teachers. I worked so hard to observe the lessons carefully, but when experienced teachers shared their observations during the post-lesson discussions, I was always shocked. I had been in the same classroom, at the same time, with the same conditions. But how much those educators could see! I had never realized. It’s so important to develop one’s eye and hone the power of observation. 
— Dr. Akihko Takahashi, Associate Professor of Elementary Mathematics, DePaul University, Chicago, IL

Within the Lesson Study protocol, we reserve time at the end of the post-lesson discussion for a knowledgeable other. Today, Dr. Harold Asturias, will provide his reflection on the research lesson as it unfolded before us. The role of knowledgeable other has many aspects, including how to model the careful observation of students. The responsibility includes carefully building upon the post-lesson discussion to address the goals of the planning team, referencing relevant research and curriculum, and helping the teacher move to a new level of understanding in their inquiry. Expect to leave the Wednesday event energized about mathematics teaching and learning and observing your students in new ways!

Dr. Asturias' talk will lead participants to understand the lesson through the lens of the five dimensions of the Teaching for Robust Understanding framework (TRU), developed by Alan Schoenfled, UC Berkeley, and implemented in the Oakland Unified School District Lesson Study project, among others.

TRU is a framework for characterizing powerful learning environments in crisp and actionable ways. It provides a research-based response to the question “What are the attributes of equitable and robust learning environments — environments in which all students are supported in becoming knowledgeable, flexible, and resourceful disciplinary thinkers?”



Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Harold Asturias

Harold Asturias

Director, Center for Mathematics Excellence and Equity, University of California Berkeley
Harold Asturias is the director of the Center for Mathematics Excellence and Equity (CeMEE) at UC Berkeley. He has experience providing professional development in the areas of standards and assessment in math for large urban districts and smaller rural districts. He has also designed... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 1:15pm - 1:35pm
Hillcrest Elementary School (SFUSD) 810 Silver Ave, San Francisco, CA 94134

1:35pm

A Focus on Student Thinking
This session is a part of our special Wednesday focus on professional development in mathematics. It will take place at Hillcrest Elementary School in San Francisco.

Children have lots of ideas and love to share them!  Yet the math classroom is often focused on the ideas of others, not those of the students.  What are we doing to elicit those ideas and use them to inform our instruction?  I’ll focus on the lesson with the lens of how instructional moves supported — or missed supporting — making students’ thinking visible.  

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Annie Fetter

Annie Fetter

21st Century Partnership for STEM Education
I live outside Philadelphia and in central Vermont, but have been doing math with educators in California since the early 1990s.  I worked on the project that developed the first version of the Geometer’s Sketchpad and was a founding staff member of the Math Forum, an online math... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 1:35pm - 2:30pm
Hillcrest Elementary School (SFUSD) 810 Silver Ave, San Francisco, CA 94134
 
Thursday, October 17
 

TBA

Moving Maths
An exploration of the emotional side of mathematics, and how it affects the way we discuss and teach it. We'll explore how the use of dynamic (moving) software (like Geogebra and/or Desmos) can fundamentally change the way we think about the subject. Expect some old classics — and some new surprises. May contain live music!

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Ben Sparks

Ben Sparks

Mathematician, Musician, Teacher & Speaker
Ben is a mathematician, musician, and public speaker. For 10 years he taught mathematics to pupils aged 11–18 in the UK. Now he gives math talks, workshops, and teacher training around the world.He is excited about mathematics education and about sharing the humanity and excitement... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

TBA

Sense-Making: Is it at the Core of Your Math Program?
Are your students making sense of the mathematics they explore? Do they feel that mathematics is an inherently sensible endeavor? We’ll look at ways in which students don’t make sense of mathematics, consider why, and discuss strategies for making it a larger part of classroom expectation.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Annie Fetter

Annie Fetter

21st Century Partnership for STEM Education
I live outside Philadelphia and in central Vermont, but have been doing math with educators in California since the early 1990s.  I worked on the project that developed the first version of the Geometer’s Sketchpad and was a founding staff member of the Math Forum, an online math... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Hillsborough Campus 6565 Skyline Boulevard, Hillsborough, CA 94010

TBA

Creative First Steps Into Hands-On Number Theory for the Elementary Grades 1-5 – A Pythagorean Approach 
In this workshop we will create a mathematically and visually stimulating hands-on environment in which participants will discover and create polygonal numbers using interlinking colored blocks. The approach is inspired by the teachings of Pythagoras and his followers, who used pebbles to turn number sequences into geometrical patterns. The interplay between numbers and geometry will give rise to questions and potential solutions, which can be transferable to the participants’ own students in a similar setting. Number theory is the exploration of the properties of numbers. When we arrange whole numbers with manipulatives, the properties of numbers and the geometrical relations between them become visual. This aspect of numbers can naturally be accessed by students irrespective of their previous mathematical experience or approach to numbers. It allows for an originality of creativity that a pure paper-and-pencil setting would not afford. 

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Peter Koehler

Peter Koehler

Lower School Math Enrichment Teacher, The Nueva School
Peter Koehler holds a PhD in theoretical and elementary particle physics from Royal Holloway College, University of London; a master’s degree from Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London; and carried out post-doc studies in the theory group at Stanford Linear... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Hillsborough Campus 6565 Skyline Boulevard, Hillsborough, CA 94010

TBA

Fostering Mathematical Communication in an Advanced Math Class
Communication often takes a back seat to results in the math classroom, but as students move into more advanced material they find that their ability to read, discuss, and write about mathematics becomes indispensable. How can we scaffold their learning process around these important skills? This session will begin with a classroom observation of a linear algebra class in which students discuss excerpts from their math textbook, present their proof attempts, and provide feedback on the efforts of their peers. After observing the classroom, we will adjourn to discuss what we noticed, how these students are evolving as mathematical communicators, and how we can support their efforts.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Jana Comstock

Jana Comstock

Upper School Math Teacher, The Nueva School
Jana Comstock joined the faculty at Nueva in 2008, having previously taught at Brooklyn’s Saint Ann’s School, UC Berkeley, UC San Diego, Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Talented Youth, Groton School in Massachusetts, and Miss Porter’s School in Connecticut. Jana has... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

TBA

Mathematical Provocations and Differentiating Math Instruction
What are mathematical provocations? How can mathematical provocations help engage, challenge, and differentiate a range of learners? How do they help highlight beautiful and exciting aspects of mathematics for all students? In this workshop, we’ll look at some problems and projects that we have done with students and discuss the learning goals and skills covered. It is our hope that educators will be inspired and find practical application of these ideas in their own classrooms after the sessions.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Katie Kelly

Katie Kelly

3rd Grade Teacher, The Nueva School
Katie Kelly teaches third grade at Nueva. Katie has worked as a second grade art teacher, sixth grade associate teacher, and also was an interim lead sixth grade teacher at the Trinity School in Atlanta, Georgia. She began her teaching career after working as a photojournalist and... Read More →
avatar for Lora Saarnio

Lora Saarnio

Lower School Math and Computer Science Specialist, The Nueva School
Lora Saarnio has taught K-12 humanities, math and science. She previously taught high school English and middle school math and science; currently, she works with students in Grades 1-5 as a Math and Computer Science Specialist at The Nueva School. Lora is also Director Emerita of... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Hillsborough Campus 6565 Skyline Boulevard, Hillsborough, CA 94010

TBA

Teaching Through Problem Solving: Three-Part Series of Live Demonstration Lessons for Deriving the Formula for Finding the Area of Quadrilaterals (PART 1)
Come see how a thread of mathematical thinking is developed with students by connecting visual models, numerical expressions, and justification with intriguing problems. Over a three-day mini-unit designed for students to derive the formula for finding the area of quadrilaterals through solving a series of problems and comparing their solutions with several different approaches by their peers, master teacher Dr. Takahashi will lead a middle school class into a deep dive into important mathematical ideas. Each of the lessons is designed for the students to experience communicating their own reasoning to others by expressing their own ways of solving the problems in mathematical expressions. At the same time, students will have opportunities to infer their peers’ ways of thinking by interpreting their mathematical expressions. Throughout, students will be expected to justify the reasonableness of their own and others’ strategies and mathematical expressions. These experiences are expected to foster their skill for developing viable arguments and critiquing the reasoning of others (CCSS-M MP3), while the process of writing and interpreting mathematical expressions helps students develop the ability to reason quantitatively and abstractly.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Akihiko Takahashi

Akihiko Takahashi

Associate Professor of Mathematics Education, DePaul University
Akihiko Takahashi, PhD, is an associate professor at DePaul University, where he teaches mathematics and mathematics education. Before coming to the US from Japan, he was a schoolteacher and then an educator of mathematics teachers. He was nationally active in mathematics Lesson Study... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

TBA

Three Proofs Every Student Should See
Much of a student’s early exposure to mathematics is grounded in what works based on trial and error and learning specific algorithms to achieve useful results. But professional and recreational mathematicians alike will tell you that the heart of mathematics is in problem solving, reasoning, and communication, not calculation. As a result, while they may be well prepared to USE math in other disciplines, many students matriculate having made decisions about their desire (and fitness!) to take college math classes without have ever seen any comparable material — and they miss out on the beauty of the ideas underpinning these undeniably powerful results! How do we reconcile the disparity between the practical introduction emphasized by most K–12 standards and the philosophical approach that is the hallmark and main recommendation of advanced mathematics? In this session we will discuss three accessible proofs that offer a window into the mathematical mindset while supporting and illuminating a standard approach to calculation, as well as appropriate ways to tie them into traditional curricula.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Jana Comstock

Jana Comstock

Upper School Math Teacher, The Nueva School
Jana Comstock joined the faculty at Nueva in 2008, having previously taught at Brooklyn’s Saint Ann’s School, UC Berkeley, UC San Diego, Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Talented Youth, Groton School in Massachusetts, and Miss Porter’s School in Connecticut. Jana has... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

TBA

Social Justice and Mathematics: One Road Map to Creating a Class
Nueva has long supported an interdisciplinary approach in which learning is authentic and focused on students’ interests and needs. Nueva classes encourage students to tackle messy, complex problems in which construction of knowledge is a practice shared by students, teachers, and environment. The mathematics team at Nueva firmly believes that mathematics is essential to deeply understand social and political issues. The session focuses on our experiences in building a mathematics course grounded in social justice. We will discuss how we gathered resources, defined goals and content objectives, and created projects that support understanding social issues through a mathematical lens. We will share the success and growing pains of such a course and possible ideas of how to embed social justice issues into other mathematical courses.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Danielle McReynolds-Dell

Danielle McReynolds-Dell

Upper School Math Teacher, The Nueva School
Danielle McReynolds-Dell joins Nueva as an Upper School mathematics teacher, most recently from Bentley School in Lafayette, CA. She has been teaching high school math for 15 years, beginning her career at Clayton Valley High School in Concord, CA, teaching a wide variety of courses... Read More →
avatar for Veena Krishnan

Veena Krishnan

Upper School Math and Science Teacher, The Nueva School
Veena Krishnan joined Nueva as an US Math Teacher in July 2016. Previously she was at Webb School of Knoxville, where she mostly taught AP Calculus, Multivariable Calculus, Honors Precalculus, and Algebra II. She received the Dr. Edward l. Tauxe award in 2012-2013 that recognizes... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

TBA

A Visual Hands-on Approach to Building Perfect Numbers: A Perfect Theme for Gifted Students in the Elementary Grades 2-5
Perfect numbers are a perfect portal into advanced arithmetic for the mathematically gifted and curious student. But how do we find a perfect number? Using a combination of colored interlinking blocks and paper and pencil, participants will find the sum of the divisors of the numbers from 1 to 12. Visual patterns will emerge, deductions and discoveries will be made. Each sum has different characteristics: some sums have characteristics in common, but, as the blocks will illustrate, perfect numbers have a special arithmetic feature. Participants will create hands-on visual representations of the first 3 perfect numbers, and discover that perfect numbers are also triangle numbers, which share an internal structure. 




Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Peter Koehler

Peter Koehler

Lower School Math Enrichment Teacher, The Nueva School
Peter Koehler holds a PhD in theoretical and elementary particle physics from Royal Holloway College, University of London; a master’s degree from Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London; and carried out post-doc studies in the theory group at Stanford Linear... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
Nueva Hillsborough Campus 6565 Skyline Boulevard, Hillsborough, CA 94010

TBA

Growth Mindset and Student Empowerment via Flexible Groupings in the Math Classroom
Research shows a flexible math grouping model alleviates stress around math tracking, propels students into greater ownership of their learning, and creates opportunities for dynamic differentiation. In this presentation, you will explore some of the research behind this model, observe fifth- and sixth-grade flexible math groupings in action, hear student reflections on this model, and have time to discuss  and ask questions.

Wednesday & Thursday Slate
avatar for Lissie McAlvey

Lissie McAlvey

Middle School Math Teacher, The Nueva School
Lissie joins Nueva from Chicago, where she was a middle school teacher at an independent school on the city’s south side. Before that, she taught middle school math for two years and coached basketball and soccer in her hometown of East Lansing, Michigan. She received her BA in... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 TBA
TBA
 
Friday, October 18
 

8:15am

Paving a Successful Pathway in STEM for Low-income Populations
Mathematics is supposed to be a universal language — beautiful, expressive of human thought, and a vehicle for the study of truth. Then why is not equally accessible to everyone? Students from low-income backgrounds and underrepresented minorities rarely access deeper mathematical study, and so math and math-related careers can seem locked away from them.

We will seek to understand what kind of education many successful students receive in science and math, and how to support students from historically marginalized communities to achieve at the same level. The talk will present results from Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics (BEAM), along with lessons learned about tailoring programs to reach out to new communities, how to adjust problems and topics for students who might have less background, and how to help make mathematics more accessible without sacrificing content. Participants will see specific strategies for supporting advanced work for underserved students. This session is likely to be especially relevant for teachers, program leaders, college advisors, and funders or policy makers.

Friday Slate
avatar for Daniel Zaharopol

Daniel Zaharopol

Executive Director, The Art of Problem Solving Initiative, Inc.
Daniel Zaharopol is the executive director of the Art of Problem Solving Initiative, Inc., where he founded and runs Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics (BEAM). BEAM creates pathways for students from low-income and historically marginalized communities to become mathematicians... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 8:15am - 9:15am
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

8:15am

Teaching Through Problem Solving: A Japanese Approach to Promote Mathematical Practice
Teaching mathematics by telling students facts and procedures may be an easy instructional method for teachers. However, when students are passively listening to teachers, their opportunities to understand mathematical concepts and procedures and to develop mathematical competencies are not maximized. As the Common Core State Standards emphasizes, students need to develop mathematical practice through active involvement in mathematics — by doing mathematical activities and solving problems — rather than just listening to teachers talk. Influenced by US publications of problem-solving, including Polya’s How to Solve It (1945) and NCTM's An Agenda for Action: Recommendations for School Mathematics of the 1980s (1980), Japanese researchers and teachers worked collaboratively to develop an approach to promote mathematical thinking and problem solving: “mondai-kaiketsu gakusyuu,” which means “teaching through problem solving” (TTP). This session will use some of the examples from Japanese mathematics textbooks to discuss key features of TTP and how schools can use this approach to promote CCSS-M mathematical practice.

Friday Slate
avatar for Akihiko Takahashi

Akihiko Takahashi

Associate Professor of Mathematics Education, DePaul University
Akihiko Takahashi, PhD, is an associate professor at DePaul University, where he teaches mathematics and mathematics education. Before coming to the US from Japan, he was a schoolteacher and then an educator of mathematics teachers. He was nationally active in mathematics Lesson Study... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 8:15am - 9:15am
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

9:25am

Building More Equitable Mathematics Instruction by Teaching Through Problem-solving
In Teaching Through Problem-solving, students learn each new mathematical concept or procedure by solving a challenging problem that embodies the new mathematics. Analyze video from urban elementary schools where Teaching Through Problem-solving has dramatically improved student achievement, with a focus on practices you can use to build more equitable mathematics learning in your site, including student-led questioning routines, planned board use, and reflective mathematics journals.

Friday Slate
avatar for Akihiko Takahashi

Akihiko Takahashi

Associate Professor of Mathematics Education, DePaul University
Akihiko Takahashi, PhD, is an associate professor at DePaul University, where he teaches mathematics and mathematics education. Before coming to the US from Japan, he was a schoolteacher and then an educator of mathematics teachers. He was nationally active in mathematics Lesson Study... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Friedkin

Shelley Friedkin

Senior Research Associate, Mills College
Shelley Friedkin is a senior research associate for Lesson Study Group at Mills College. She graduated from Brunel University in England with an elementary teaching credential and taught in Central London. She received her doctorate in education leadership from Mills College. For... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Lewis

Catherine Lewis

Senior Research Scientist, Mills College
Catherine Lewis, PhD, comes from four generations of public school teachers. Her video and print materials have introduced many educators to Lesson Study (LS; www.lessonresearch.net ). She has directed a series of federally funded grants to improve and research LS, establishing that... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 9:25am - 10:25am
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

10:35am

STEM as a Pathway to Mathematics for All Learners
Rapidly changing technologies are permeating all aspects of our world at an exponential rate, forcing us to redefine skills for our globalized, collaborative, and technology-driven humanity. As education systems consider what skills, tools and mindsets are needed in a future characterized by unprecedented change and uncertainty, we need to pay careful attention to developing critical capacities and competencies that will enable our future leaders, learners, and innovators to think creatively, collaborate powerfully, and solve problems tenaciously as we venture into the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Through carefully designed, active engagement in STEM learning experiences, students learn the skills, tools and mindsets required to be actively engaged citizens. Sadly, for far too many students, math is a critical gatekeeper that unjustly filters them out of STEM, leaving them ill-equipped to actively participate and thrive in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. This talk discusses how we can change the equation for many students by mathematizing STEM and teaching math differently.

Friday Slate
avatar for Gina Cherkowski

Gina Cherkowski

Chief Educator Officer, STEM Learning Lab
Dr. Cherkowski is an educational game changer on a mission to ensure all students have access to high-quality STEM learning experiences so they are aptly prepared for our technology-driven, dynamic world. Dr. Cherkowski holds a PhD in mathematics education as well as in culture studies... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 10:35am - 11:35am
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

10:35am

Teaching Through Problem Solving: Three-Part Series of Live Demonstration Lessons for Deriving the Formula for Finding the Area of Quadrilaterals (PART 2)
Come see how a thread of mathematical thinking is developed with students by connecting visual models, numerical expressions, and justification with intriguing problems. Over a three-day mini-unit designed for students to derive the formula for finding the area of quadrilaterals through solving a series of problems and comparing their solutions with several different approaches by their peers, master teacher Dr. Takahashi will lead a middle school class into a deep dive into important mathematical ideas. Each of the lessons is designed for the students to experience communicating their own reasoning to others by expressing their own ways of solving the problems in mathematical expressions. At the same time, students will have opportunities to infer their peers’ ways of thinking by interpreting their mathematical expressions. Throughout, students will be expected to justify the reasonableness of their own and others’ strategies and mathematical expressions. These experiences are expected to foster their skill for developing viable arguments and critiquing the reasoning of others (CCSS-M MP3), while the process of writing and interpreting mathematical expressions helps students develop the ability to reason quantitatively and abstractly.

Friday Slate
avatar for Akihiko Takahashi

Akihiko Takahashi

Associate Professor of Mathematics Education, DePaul University
Akihiko Takahashi, PhD, is an associate professor at DePaul University, where he teaches mathematics and mathematics education. Before coming to the US from Japan, he was a schoolteacher and then an educator of mathematics teachers. He was nationally active in mathematics Lesson Study... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 10:35am - 11:35am
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

12:35pm

Detracking Policy in SFUSD: Our Ongoing Commitment to Equity, the Lessons We Have Learned, and the Questions We Still Have
The SFUSD Class of 2019 was our first cohort of students to experience detracked heterogeneous eighth-, ninth-, and tenth-grade Common Core math. Now that they have graduated, what new insights do we have about the impacts of our policy? We continue to analyze data, work with stakeholders, and make adjustments to sustain our commitment to all learners. This session will describe how we have responded to both public scrutiny and curiosity about our successes and challenges, and name the questions we still have. There will be opportunities both for questions and for considering how this might resonate in your own contexts.

Friday Slate
avatar for Lizzy Hull Barnes

Lizzy Hull Barnes

Math Supervisor, San Francisco Unified School District
Lizzy Hull Barnes has taught math to PreK–6th graders in schools around the Bay Area, and she has supported the learning of adults in Louisiana and fellow teachers and coaches in San Francisco. The Common Core has provided all of us a precious window to reframe the question "What... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

12:35pm

Magical Maths
Magic and maths have gone together for hundreds of years. The reasoning behind many magic effects is inherently mathematical and logical, and mathematical tools can reveal the secrets if you’re brave enough to use them. We'll explore some mathematical magical classics, and how they can be used to provoke curiosity in the classroom.

Friday Slate
avatar for Ben Sparks

Ben Sparks

Mathematician, Musician, Teacher & Speaker
Ben is a mathematician, musician, and public speaker. For 10 years he taught mathematics to pupils aged 11–18 in the UK. Now he gives math talks, workshops, and teacher training around the world.He is excited about mathematics education and about sharing the humanity and excitement... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

1:45pm

Assessment for Learning
American schools are overwhelmed with high-stakes testing, which leads to benchmark testing — just testing for testing’s sake. We need to shift the focus to assessment for learning. This requires instructional shifts in practice to emphasize learning over grading. This session introduces a formative assessment process to deepen learning.

Friday Slate
avatar for David Foster

David Foster

Executive Director, Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative
David Foster is the executive director of the Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative (SVMI), comprising over 160 member districts in the greater San Francisco Bay Area. Besides the intensive work in California, SVMI consults in states across the country, including New York, Illinois... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

2:55pm

What Does it Take to Succeed in Science and Math? An Equity-Focused Approach to Advanced Study
Across the US, different communities of students receive different messages about what success means. In underserved communities, the message is often about the basics: get good grades and pass your tests. Meanwhile, more privileged students are told about extracurricular programs, independent research projects, internships, and self-study. The result is that when they get to college, students might be in the same classroom, but they have radically different preparation for STEM work. Few underserved students receive the kind of education that prepares them to break barriers as scientists or for careers at top tech firms. This talk will look at trends in data surrounding student achievement. We want to better understand the academic ecosystem in which students find themselves and will consider approaches to addressing the disparities. Participants will better understand their role in preparing students for STEM careers and what it means to be STEM College Ready. The content is especially relevant for teachers, program leaders, college advisors, and funders or policy makers. Participants should also be ready to see a little bit of math, although solving problems is not required!

Friday Slate
avatar for Daniel Zaharopol

Daniel Zaharopol

Executive Director, The Art of Problem Solving Initiative, Inc.
Daniel Zaharopol is the executive director of the Art of Problem Solving Initiative, Inc., where he founded and runs Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics (BEAM). BEAM creates pathways for students from low-income and historically marginalized communities to become mathematicians... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 2:55pm - 3:55pm
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403

2:55pm

Three Uncommon Messages About Mathematics That Every Student Should Know
Students often leave their math education having learned the false messages that math DOESN'T make sense or that math CAN'T make sense until an adult explains it to them. We'll discuss three counter-messages — math is POWER, that power makes SENSE, and students ALREADY HAVE that power — and concrete strategies for helping students learn them.

Friday Slate
avatar for Dan Meyer

Dan Meyer

Chief Academic Officer, Desmos
Dan Meyer taught high school math to students who didn't like high school math. He has advocated for better math instruction on CNN, Good Morning America, Every Day with Rachael Ray, and TED.com. He earned his doctorate from Stanford University in math education and is the chief academic... Read More →


Friday October 18, 2019 2:55pm - 3:55pm
Nueva Bay Meadows Campus 131 E. 28th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94403